Welcome Home

The Mission of Immaculate Conception Parish and St. Louise Chapel is to build a faith Community that worships God and supports one another as a loving family that lives and teaches the message of Jesus Christ and that reflects through service the presence of the Holy Spirit as revealed in the Magisterium of the Roman Catholic Church.

Rev. Fr. Douglas Terrien, Pastor

Rev. Fr. Joseph Tuskiewicz, Associate Pastor

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Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary Catholic Church & St. Louise Chapel

Mass Times

At Immaculate Conception Church in Lapeer, MI:
Weekend Mass (Saturday Vigil)
4:00 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. (Sunday)
8:00 a.m., 9:30 a.m.,
(10:00 a.m. at St. Louise Chapel in Metamora only),
11:00 a.m., 12:30 p.m.**
Weekday Mass (Monday to Saturday)*
8:45 a.m.

Our associate pastor, Fr. Joe Tuskiewicz celebrates Latin Mass each Thursday at 8:45 A.M. at Immaculate Conception. Fr. Joe continues the tradition by doing the Solemn High Mass at 12:30 pm on the last Sunday of each month.

Holy Day Mass
8:45 am, Noon, 5:30 pm & 7:00 pm at Immaculate Conception Church
Please check this website or bulletin for any different times.

Reconciliation:
Fridays, following the 8:45 am Mass; Saturday, 3:00-3:45 pm. For a private appointment, call the rectory.

Latin Mass**

LATIN MASSES...THE TRADITION CONTINUES.

The last Sunday of every month, the Traditional High Mass will be celebrated at 12:30 PM, employing the Church’s rich treasury of sacred music.

 Please join us as we celebrate this most Solemn Tradition at Immaculate Conception once again.

 

A Traditional Latin High Mass will be celebrated by Fr. Brian Hurley on July 1, 2018 at 12:30 pm. at Immaculate Conception Church. 

 

WeShare Online Giving

 “Donate Online!”

 Immaculate Conception has made Online Giving available for our weekly offerings, as well as other parish collections. Donating is simple, safe, and secure and takes less than five minutes.

 You’ll be able to give to any of our collections and view complete financial records at any time. Set up a one-time or recurring donation by following these three easy steps:

 Click on the Online Giving link.

  1. Select the collection you wish to donate to and click to make a donation.
  2. Enter your payment information.

 That’s it. You can return at any time to edit your donation or to view your financial records.

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: Which payment methods are accepted?

A: Contributions from checking accounts, savings accounts, debit cards, and credit cards (Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express) are all accepted.

Q: Do parishioners receive receipts for their donations?

A: Yes, all contributors enrolled for online giving will receive receipts via e-mail.

Q: What if parishioners feel uncomfortable not having something to physically drop into the collection basket?

A: We provide printable donation slips that can be placed into the collection basket.

Q: Is WeShare safe?

A: Yes. We implement the safest security standards for online transactions and your privacy is protected at all times. We are certified with the Payment Card Industry (PCI) Data Security Standards (DSS) as a Level 1 Service Provider.

 Q: How can I enroll and start donating?

A: Click on the link above or call the parish office for more information.

 

NEW!!!

 

 

Office Hours

Monday to Friday
9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
(Tuesday 9-5:30 p.m.)

Saturday
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Sunday
9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Healing Services

 

1st Saturdays of the Month

at 5:30 pm

(Sunday Liturgy)

If a Healing Mass falls on a holiday and/or holiday weekend, Healing Mass will be the following Saturday.

Sacrament of the Sick

(for the seriously ill)

Blessing Relics of Saints

(St. Jude and St. Peregrine)

Individual Prayer

(Parish Prayer Teams)

 

 

CSA

Your CSA gift helps more than 100 ministries in the Archdiocese to Unleash the Gospel in various ways.

Use this site to make a pledge/gift to CSA ONLY.

To give or manage pledges for Changing Lives Together (CLT), please go to give.aodclt.org.

For assistance in making your online gift or pledge, call 1-800-348-2886, Option 2 between 7:30 AM - 5:00 PM ET.

Thank you for your stewardship. Be assured of Archbishop Vigneron’s prayers and the prayers of those who minister through your generosity.

Click the logo below to be taken to the CSA website to donate.

AOD/Archdiocese of Detroit

Regarding Msgr Arthur Michael Karey

Monsignor Arthur Michael Carey (1918–1993). Ordained in 1943. Decades after his death, allegations of sexual abuse of minors were brought forward to the Archdiocesan Board of Review, considered, and are believed to be credible

Parish assignments included serving as associate pastor at St. Francis Xavier, Ecorse; St. Lawrence, Detroit; St. John the Evangelist, Detroit, and as pastor at St. Joseph, Lake Orion, Christ the King, Detroit; and St. Aloysius, Detroit.

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Archbishop of Detroit condemns family separation at border

Archbishop of Detroit Allen H. Vigneron on Wednesday released the following statement, condemning the separation of children from their parents at the U.S./Mexico border:

“We have a broken immigration system, one that separates children from their parents. This is wrong and cannot be tolerated, as it traumatizes and damages the youngest, most vulnerable among us.

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Archbishop of Detroit urges repentance from ‘the stain of many years of institutional racism’

New “pastoral note” on racism is first in series to be released in wake of year anniversary of landmark Unleash the Gospel

Archbishop of Detroit Allen H. Vigneron is urging metro Detroit’s Catholic faithful to repent from “the stain of many years of institutional racism,” in a new pastoral note called "Agents for the New Creation," penned one year after he unveiled his vision for the Church in southeast Michigan.

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Bible Search

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Bishop Barron~Word on Fire

The Question Behind the Question

On the afternoon of June 14, a rather spirited, fascinating, and unexpected debate broke out on the floor of the USCCB spring meeting about the use of videos rather than texts. I will confess that as this lively discussion unfolded, a smile spread across my face, for I have believed for some time that the issue of how we communicate is perhaps as important as what we communicate—that is, if we are interested in moving the conversation beyond a very narrow circle.

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Sowing the Wind and Reaping the Whirlwind: A Reflection on the Irish Referendum

I will confess that as a person of Irish heritage on both sides of my family, I found the events in Ireland last week particularly dispiriting. Not only did the nation vote, by a two-to-one margin, for the legal prerogative to kill their children in the womb, but they also welcomed and celebrated the vote with a frankly sickening note of gleeful triumph. Accompanying the entire process, of course, was the subtext of the Catholic Church’s cultural impotence, even irrelevance, in the wake of the great crimes of the last several decades. Is there a way forward for Ireland?

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Michelle Wolf and the Throwaway Culture

At this year’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner, the comedian Michelle Wolf joked about "knocking around" unborn children, in order to abort them. Her shameless endorsement of abortion places her in line with Friedrich Nietzsche, who had a special contempt for the Christian values of sympathy and compassion for the vulnerable and believed all morality was relative. But if Wolf and Nietzsche are right—if good and evil are merely relative states of affairs—then there is nothing to hem in and control the tendency of cultural elites to dominate others. When objective moral values evanesce, armies of the expendable emerge.

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