The Mission of Immaculate Conception  Parish is to build a faith community that worships God and supports one another as a loving family that lives and teaches the message of Jesus Christ, and that reflects through service the presence of the Holy Spirit as revealed in the Magisterium of the Roman Catholic Church.

Fr. Brian Hurley, 

Pastor

Rev. Mr. Joseph Hulway,

                                                   Deacon

 

Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary Catholic Church

Rectory Hours

 

The Rectory Hours

Monday 11 am to 5 pm

Tuesday 9 am to 5 pm

Wednesday 9 am to 5 pm 

Thursday 9 am to 5 pm

Closed Friday,

Saturday and Sunday (please call ahead of time)

AOD News

FAMILIES OF PARISHES

Synod 16 called for a complete renewal of structures of our parishes to make them radically mission-oriented. Our goal is to make our parishes places where individuals and families can encounter Jesus anew, grow as disciples, and be equipped to be witnesses to the Risen Christ. This continues to be our mission today, even now in the midst of a historic pandemic.

 https://www.familiesofparishes.org/

Welcome to Immaculate Conception Catholic Parish website.  We are frequently under construction, updating news as it comes along.  If you are new to the area, we invite you to worship with us and participate in our parish activities.

We extend a special invitation to those who may have been away from the church for a while to rejoin us.

Through this website, we hope to provide opportunities to grow in faith through some of the links that are offered and to keep you up to date with parish activities.

Bulletin on line

 

To access our bulletin online https://parishesonline.com/,

or use bulletin tab at the top of this page.

 

 

Mass Times

ALL PUBLIC MASSES MAY BE VIEWED VIA FACEBOOK, click on the FB link above.

DAILY: Mon. to Thurs.  9:00 a.m. (Tues & ThursTraditional Latin Mass),

   1st Fri & 1st Sat. will be 9:00 am Mass.

SATURDAY: 4:30 p.m Mass.

SUNDAY:  8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. & 12:00 p.m. (12:00 pm is Traditional Latin Mass)

  

Holy Day Mass: Please check this website, see below, or bulletin for times.

Reconciliation: Tuesday following the 9:00 am Mass; Saturday, 3:00-3:45 pm. 1st Wednesday of the month at 8:00 pm and 1st Friday of the month at 10:00 am.  For a private appointment, call the rectory.

Latin Mass**

Fr. Hurley
LATIN MASSES...THE TRADITION CONTINUES. 
Immaculate Conception Church celebrates the Traditional Latin Mass every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 9:00 A.M.  On Sunday's the Traditional High Mass is celebrated at 12:00 PM, employing the Church’s rich treasury of sacred music.
Please join us as we celebrate this most Solemn Tradition at Immaculate Conception once again.

 

Office Hours

Monday thru Thursday
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m

Closed
Friday
Saturday and Sunday (call ahead)

Food Pantry

Immaculate Conception Food Pantry

 

 

Serving Clients every

Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm

Please bring your identification

and proof of income

If you have questions, please see Dawn in the pantry

 

 

Online Giving

Lighthouse Media

    Lighthouse Catholic Media's mission is to help Catholics understand, live, and share their faith. All of our programs and offerings, including our video-based study programs, FORMED, our Graduate School of Theology, as well as our books and Lighthouse Talks, help our Apostolate reach souls for Christ.

Lighthouse Media/Augustine Institute  Visit our kiosk inside of Immaculate Conception Church, west side of the church, inside the vestibule. You will be amazed and delighted at the titles of the CD's we have available for listening and learning and enjoyment. The CD's are affordably priced; pass it on to a friend or family member to enjoy also when finished.  

 

Bible Search

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Catholic News

Update: Lebanon's Catholic leaders seek help; here's where you can donate

IMAGE: CNS photo/Aziz Taher, ReutersBy BEIRUT (CNS) -- As Lebanon's Catholic leaders appealed for help for their country, international and U.S. organizations appealed for donations for Beirut, capital of a country already suffering from a severe economic downturn.

"The church, which has set up a relief network throughout Lebanese territory, now finds itself faced with a new great duty, which it is incapable of assuming on its own," said Cardinal Bechara Rai, Maronite patriarch. He called for a U.N.-controlled fund to be set up to manage aid for the reconstruction of Beirut and other international assistance to aid the stricken country.

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Priest's 100-mile bike ride raises COVID-19 aid for parish -- and hope

IMAGE: CNS photo/courtesy Diocese of BrooklynBy Ian AlvanoWASHINGTON (CNS) -- Father Christopher Heanue started his morning July 27 by celebrating Mass at 5 a.m. and then took off on a 100-mile bike ride.

It wasn't just any ride. Father Heanue called his journey "100 Miles of Hope," which was a fundraiser to help support his parish, Holy Child Jesus, in Richmond Hill, New York, in the Brooklyn Diocese. He is the administrator and a parochial vicar of the parish in the New York borough of Queens.

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Weapons must be set aside for peace to flourish, pope says

IMAGE: CNS photo/Yuriko Nakao, ReutersBy Carol GlatzVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- For peace to flourish, weapons of war must be set aside, especially nuclear weapons that can obliterate entire cities and countries, Pope Francis said on the 75th anniversary of the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima.

"May the prophetic voices" of the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki "continue to serve as a warning to us and for coming generations," he said in a written message sent Aug. 6 to Hidehiko Yuzaki, governor of the Hiroshima prefecture, who led a peace memorial ceremony.

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Bishop Barron~Word on Fire

Canceling Padre Serra

I have just received word that, after voting to remove a large statue of St. Junípero Serra that stands in front of their City Hall, the government of Ventura, California (which is in my pastoral region) is now considering removing the image of Padre Serra from the county seal. This entire effort to erase the memory of Serra is from a historical standpoint ridiculous and from a moral standpoint more than a little frightening. Let me address the ridiculous side first. To state it bluntly, Junípero Serra is being used as a convenient scapegoat and whipping boy for certain abuses inherent to eighteenth-century Spanish colonialism. Were such abuses real? Of course. But was Fr. Serra personally responsible for them? Of course not. I won’t deny for a moment that Serra probably engaged in certain disciplinary practices that we would rightfully regard as morally questionable, but the overwhelming evidence suggests that…

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Cancelando al Padre Serra

Acabo de recibir la noticia de que, después de votar para retirar una gran estatua de san Junípero Serra que se encuentra frente a su ayuntamiento, el gobierno de Ventura, California (que está en mi región pastoral) está considerando ahora la posibilidad de retirar la imagen del Padre Serra del sello de la ciudad y de las insignias de los oficiales de policía de Ventura. Todo este esfuerzo por borrar la memoria de Serra es desde el punto de vista histórico ridículo y desde el punto de vista moral más que un poco aterrador. Déjenme abordar el lado ridículo primero. Para decirlo sin rodeos, Junípero Serra está siendo utilizado como un conveniente chivo expiatorio de ciertos abusos inherentes al colonialismo español del siglo XVIII. ¿Fueron reales esos abusos? Por supuesto. ¿Pero fue el Padre Serra personalmente responsable de ellos? Por supuesto que no. No negaré ni por un momento que…

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Martin Luther King and the Religious Motivation for Social Change

A principal reason why the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s was so successful both morally and practically was that it was led largely by people with a strong religious sensibility. The most notable of these leaders was, of course, Martin Luther King. To appreciate the subtle play between King’s religious commitment and his practical work, I would draw your attention to two texts—namely, his Letter from the Birmingham City Jail and his “I Have a Dream” speech, both from 1963. While imprisoned in Birmingham for leading a nonviolent protest, King responded to certain of his fellow Christian ministers who had criticized him for going too fast, expecting social change to happen overnight. The Baptist minister answered his critics in a perhaps surprising manner, invoking the aid of a medieval Catholic theologian. King drew their attention to the reflections of St. Thomas Aquinas on law, specifically Thomas’ theory…

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