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The Mission of Immaculate Conception  Parish is to build a faith community that worships God and supports one another as a loving family that lives and teaches the message of Jesus Christ, and that reflects through service the presence of the Holy Spirit as revealed in the Magisterium of the Roman Catholic Church.

           Fr. Brian Hurley, Pastor                      Rev. Mr. Joseph Hulway, Deacon

 

 

Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary Catholic Church

AOD News

FAMILIES OF PARISHES

Synod 16 called for a complete renewal of structures of our parishes to make them radically mission-oriented. Our goal is to make our parishes places where individuals and families can encounter Jesus anew, grow as disciples, and be equipped to be witnesses to the Risen Christ. This continues to be our mission today, even now in the midst of a historic pandemic.

 https://www.familiesofparishes.org/

Office of Priestly Vocations

 

men of the hearts

THE PRIESTHOOD IS THE LOVE

OF THE HEART OF JESUS

http://detroitpriestlyvocations.com/

Broken Rosaries?

Bring your broken rosaries to the Rectory

with your name and phone number attached

and we will get them repaired for you!

 

Too Sick for Mass?

Support our Parish no matter where you are!

Sign-in to get your bulletin delivered right to your inbox! 

https://parishesonline.com/

or bulletin tab at the top of this page.

 

 

Mass Times

ALL PUBLIC MASSES MAY BE VIEWED VIA FACEBOOK, click on the FB link above.

DAILY: Mon. thru Thurs.  9:00 a.m. (Tues & ThursTraditional Latin Mass),

   1st Fri & 1st Sat. @ 9:00 am Mass.

SATURDAY: 4:30 p.m Mass.

SUNDAY:  8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. & 12:00 p.m. (12:00 pm is Traditional Latin Mass)

  

Holy Day Mass: Please check this website, or the bulletin for times.

Reconciliation: Tuesday following the 9:00 am Mass; Saturday, 3:00-3:45 pm. 1st Wednesday of the month at 8:00 pm and 1st Friday of the month at 10:00 am.  For a private appointment, call the rectory.

Latin Mass**

Fr. Hurley
LATIN MASSES...THE TRADITION CONTINUES. 
Immaculate Conception Church celebrates the Traditional Latin Mass every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 9:00 A.M.  On Sunday's the Traditional High Mass is celebrated at 12:00 PM, employing the Church’s rich treasury of sacred music.
Please join us as we celebrate this most Solemn Tradition at Immaculate Conception once again.

 

Office Hours

Monday 11 am - 5 pm
Tuesday thru Thursday
9 am - 5 pm

Closed
Friday
Saturday and Sunday (call ahead)

Food Pantry

Immaculate Conception Food Pantry

Serving Clients every

Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm

Please bring your identification

and proof of income

If you have questions, please see Dawn in the pantry

 

 

Online Giving

Lighthouse Media

    Lighthouse Catholic Media's mission is to help Catholics understand, live, and share their faith. All of our programs and offerings, including our video-based study programs, FORMED, our Graduate School of Theology, as well as our books and Lighthouse Talks, help our Apostolate reach souls for Christ.

Lighthouse Media/Augustine Institute  Visit our kiosk inside of Immaculate Conception Church, west side of the church, inside the vestibule. You will be amazed and delighted at the titles of the CD's we have available for listening and learning and enjoyment. The CD's are affordably priced; pass it on to a friend or family member to enjoy also when finished.  

 

Detroit Catholic.com


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