The Mission of Immaculate Conception  Parish is to build a faith community that worships God and supports one another as a loving family that lives and teaches the message of Jesus Christ, and that reflects through service the presence of the Holy Spirit as revealed in the Magisterium of the Roman Catholic Church.

Fr. Brian Hurley, 

Pastor

Rev. Mr. Joseph Hulway,

                                                   Deacon

 

Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary Catholic Church

Rectory Hours

The Rectory Hours

Monday 11 am to 5 pm

Tuesday 9 am to 5 pm

Wednesday 9 am to 5 pm 

Thursday 9 am to 5 pm

Closed Friday,

Saturday and Sunday (please call ahead of time)

AOD News

FAMILIES OF PARISHES

Synod 16 called for a complete renewal of structures of our parishes to make them radically mission-oriented. Our goal is to make our parishes places where individuals and families can encounter Jesus anew, grow as disciples, and be equipped to be witnesses to the Risen Christ. This continues to be our mission today, even now in the midst of a historic pandemic.

 https://www.familiesofparishes.org/

Welcome to Immaculate Conception Catholic Parish website.  We are frequently under construction, updating news as it comes along.  If you are new to the area, we invite you to worship with us and participate in our parish activities.

We extend a special invitation to those who may have been away from the church for a while to rejoin us.

Through this website, we hope to provide opportunities to grow in faith through some of the links that are offered and to keep you up to date with parish activities.

Bulletin on line

 

To access our bulletin online https://parishesonline.com/,

or use bulletin tab at the top of this page.

 

 

Mass Times

ALL PUBLIC MASSES MAY BE VIEWED VIA FACEBOOK, click on the FB link above.

DAILY: Mon. to Thurs.  9:00 a.m. (Tues & ThursTraditional Latin Mass),

   1st Fri & 1st Sat. will be 9:00 am Mass.

SATURDAY: 4:30 p.m Mass.

SUNDAY:  8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. & 12:00 p.m. (12:00 pm is Traditional Latin Mass)

  

Holy Day Mass: Please check this website, see below, or bulletin for times.

Reconciliation: Tuesday following the 9:00 am Mass; Saturday, 3:00-3:45 pm. 1st Wednesday of the month at 8:00 pm and 1st Friday of the month at 10:00 am.  For a private appointment, call the rectory.

Latin Mass**

Fr. Hurley
LATIN MASSES...THE TRADITION CONTINUES. 
Immaculate Conception Church celebrates the Traditional Latin Mass every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 9:00 A.M.  On Sunday's the Traditional High Mass is celebrated at 12:00 PM, employing the Church’s rich treasury of sacred music.
Please join us as we celebrate this most Solemn Tradition at Immaculate Conception once again.

 

Office Hours

Monday thru Thursday
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m

Closed
Friday
Saturday and Sunday (call ahead)

Food Pantry

Immaculate Conception Food Pantry

 

 

Serving Clients every

Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm

Please bring your identification

and proof of income

If you have questions, please see Dawn in the pantry

 

 

Online Giving

Lighthouse Media

    Lighthouse Catholic Media's mission is to help Catholics understand, live, and share their faith. All of our programs and offerings, including our video-based study programs, FORMED, our Graduate School of Theology, as well as our books and Lighthouse Talks, help our Apostolate reach souls for Christ.

Lighthouse Media/Augustine Institute  Visit our kiosk inside of Immaculate Conception Church, west side of the church, inside the vestibule. You will be amazed and delighted at the titles of the CD's we have available for listening and learning and enjoyment. The CD's are affordably priced; pass it on to a friend or family member to enjoy also when finished.  

 

Bible Search

Advanced search

Detroit Catholic.com


Powered by the Holy Spirit
boldly sharing the Gospel.

Your go-to source for Catholic news in the Archdiocese of Detroit.
Subscribe here.


 

Catholic News

Vatican-China agreement: Secretary Pompeo enters the debate

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — About 10 days before he was expected in Rome, U.S. Secretary...

Read More

Barrett’s Supreme Court nomination gives spotlight to Notre Dame Law School

WASHINGTON (CNS) — If Judge Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed to the Supreme Court, she...

Read More

Priests say Turkish attacks in northern Iraq displace Christians

AMMAN, Jordan (CNS) — Iraqi Christian priests warn that the latest Turkish military attacks in...

Read More

Bishop Barron~Word on Fire

Acknowledging an Abyss; Finding a Bridge

One of the most remarkable differences between the social protests of the 1960’s and those of today is that the former were done in concert with, and often under the explicit leadership of, religious people. One has only to think of the crucially important role played by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King and so many of his colleagues and disciples in the civil rights demonstrations fifty and sixty years ago. But we don’t find today the same concert between those agitating for social change and the religious leadership. There are many reasons for this phenomenon. Perhaps the most important is simply that the number of people who subscribe to religion, especially in the ranks of the young, has precipitously dropped in our society. But I also think that there is something subtler at play as well, and I have to put on my philosopher’s hat to articulate it. In…

Read More

Reconocer un abismo; encontrar un puente

Una de las diferencias más notables entre las protestas sociales de la década de 1960 y las de hoy es que las primeras se hicieron en concierto con —y a menudo bajo el liderazgo explícito de— personas religiosas. Basta pensar en el papel crucial desempeñado por el Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King y tantos de sus colegas y discípulos en las manifestaciones de los derechos civiles hace cincuenta y sesenta años. Pero hoy no encontramos el mismo concierto entre aquellos que agitan por el cambio social y el liderazgo religioso. Hay muchas razones para este fenómeno. Quizás lo más importante es simplemente que el número de personas que se adhieren a la religión, especialmente en las filas de los jóvenes, ha disminuido precipitadamente en nuestra sociedad. Pero también creo que hay algo más sutil en juego también, y tengo que ponerme mi sombrero de filósofo para articularlo. En la década…

Read More

You’re Meant to Be an Eagle, Not a Chicken: A Reflection on Baptism

When I was doing full-time parish ministry, one of my favorite activities was performing Baptisms. I put the word in the plural, for I hardly ever baptized one baby at a time, but usually ten or a dozen. Typically, the quite large group of family and friends would gather in the first several pews of St. Paul of the Cross Church about 2 o’clock on a Sunday afternoon, I would welcome them and do a very short description of what was about to happen, and then the happy cacophony of twelve babies crying at once would inevitably commence. I would shout my way through the prayers and the Baptisms—and a general joyfulness would obtain. Now that I’m a bishop, I have less occasion to baptize, and I do miss it. But an exception took place last week when I was delighted to welcome into the Church Hazel Rose Cummins, the…

Read More